February is Children’s Dental Health Month!

At El Centro, we make it a priority to inform our patients about the importance of dental hygiene. Our patients are cared for by professional, friendly staff to help them achieve optimal oral health.

Dental cavities are one of the most common chronic diseases in children and teens; dental sealants are an effective way to prevent these cavities. Cavities are caused by a breakdown of the tooth enamel by acids produced by bacteria located in a film that collects on teeth. Left untreated, cavities can cause pain, infection, and problems eating, speaking, and learning (Source: CDC).

According to the  American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, more than 50 percent of children will be affected by tooth decay before age five.

Keep Healthy Teeth with the 2-2-2 Rule
Help keep your child’s teeth healthy by using the 2-2-2 rule: visit your dentist two times a year, and brush and floss TWO times a day for TWO minutes.

What is tooth decay?

Tooth decay is the destruction of your tooth enamel, the hard outer layer of your teeth. The bacteria in plaque has acid that attacks the tooth and can cause holes in the tooth (tooth decay).

How often should my child see a dentist?

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends a dental check-up at least twice a year for most children. Some children will need more frequent visits because of the increased risk of tooth decay, unusual growth patterns, and poor oral hygiene.

How can I help my child enjoy good dental health?

  • Beware of frequent snacking
  • Brush twice a day with fluoride toothpaste
  • Floss once a day
  • Have sealants applied when appropriate
  • Seek regular dental check-ups

What are sealants?

Sealants protect the grooved and pitted surfaces of the teeth, especially the chewing surface of back teeth where most cavities in children are found. Sealants are made of tooth color plastic, only takes a few minutes to apply and application is pain-free.

To schedule an appointment with your El Centro dentist, please call (713) 660-1880.

Sources: The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

 

 

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